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Here and Now: Paul Nicklin - National Geographic Photographer

Here and Now: Paul Nicklin - National Geographic Photographer

Here and Now: National Geographic’s Paul Nicklin on KJZZ
Arctic photographer Paul Nicklin joins Here and Now host Steve Goldstein in-studio
for a discussion about growing up in the Arctic and capturing images of polar bears, seals, whales and other Arctic wildlife.

His current book, Polar Obsession, is getting excellent reviews.

So far, the local NPR station that broadcast this interview, KJZZ, hasn’t posted a podcast of it. Alas. I’ll update this again ifnwhen they do.

Excerpts from Paul Nicklin’s site :

How did you get into National Geographic?
“Getting recognized by National Geographic, (and even more so, completing my first assignment for them,) was the hardest thing I have ever done. At the same time, it has been the most rewarding experience of my career. I spent 8 years pestering them by sending in my latest publications from dozens of international magazines to no avail. Finally, after years of trying, National Geographic photographer Flip Nicklin mentored me and introduced me to the world of National Geographic magazine and assignments. Then, Flip, along with Joel Sartore and their editor, Kathy Moran, allowed me the opportunity to photograph a couple of underwater situations on one of their stories (see Pacific Suite, February 2003). The editorial team looked at some of my work and a few months later I got “the call” asking if I wanted to shoot an underwater story for them on Atlantic Salmon (see July 2003). Since then I have completed two other stories and have been a part of other assignments.”


F.A.Q. – What Kind Of Equipment Do You Use?

I shoot both above and below water so I need a very broad range of equipment.  I currently shoot Canon digital cameras. I likely have more equipment than I could possibly use on any one assignment! In addition to my camera gear I have multiple underwater housings, SCUBA equipment, rebreathers, underwater remotes, inflatable kayaks, computers, generators to run the computers and spare parts kits for everything and the list goes on.  I even purchased my own ultralight airplane from which to shoot aerials in the Arctic.  I usually fly with 14-20 cases weighing between 60-70 pounds each. Airlines really detest me when I show up with three or four luggage carts all linked together with rope. Every time I check in I wish more than anything that I was a good writer. Recently, a writer I was working with on a National Geographic assignment phoned me and complained about how much gear he had and decided to not bring his laptop so he would be traveling with only two pieces of luggage.

Here is some of my current Canon equipment:

  • 1Ds Mark III
  • 1D Mark III
  • Canon 1Ds Mark II
  • Canon 1D Mark II
  • Canon 24mm/2.8 prime lens
  • Canon 16-35mm/2.8 L
  • Canon 16-35/2.8II
  • Canon 24-70/2.8 L
  • Canon 70-200/2.8L IS
  • Canon 100-400/4.5-5.6 L IS
  • Canon 500/4.0 L IS
  • Canon 600/4.0 L IS
  • Canon 100/2.8 Macro lens
  • Canon 1.4x and 2x converters
  • Canon 580 EX flashes
  • Gitzo carbon-fiber and aluminum tripods
  • Foba, Wimberley and Arca Swiss heads
  • Arca type plates that my friend Andrew Wilson made for some beer (best trade I ever made!)

Other Equipment:

  • Lowepro and Pelican products
  • Seacam housings for Canon 1Ds and 1D Mark II camera’s
  • Ikelite Strobes
  • TLC strobe arms
  • 50Watt HID lights
  • Scuba Pro diving equipment
  • Buddy Inspiration Rebreather
  • Ice screws, ropes and other gear for ice diving

View Paul Nicklin Polar Obsession book listing

F.A.Q. – What Kind Of Equipment Do You Use?

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