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Henry Diltz (American, b. 1938). Tina Turner, Universal Amphitheater, Los Angeles (detail), October 1985. Chromogenic print © Henry Diltz

Henry Diltz, Tina Turner, Universal Amphitheater, Los Angeles (detail), October 1985. Chromogenic print © Henry Diltz


Last Updated: 3 November, 2009

The Brooklyn Museum is exhibiting works by photographers of Rock & Roll with an emphasis on the photographers rather than merely their celebrity subjects. Photographers include: Michael Putland, Andy Earl, Albert Watson, Baron Wolman, Max Vadukul, Barry Feinstein, Ian Dickson, Henry Diltz, Andreas Gursky, Amy Arbus, Jean-Paul Goude, David LaChapelle. (Yes, pretty heavy on the ‘guy’ photogs, eh?)

Ian Dickson, The Ramones at Eric's Club, Liverpool England

Ian Dickson, The Ramones at Eric's Club, Liverpool England

Exhibitions: Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present pays tribute to those who made the images, and thus helped make the public images of the rockers as well.


The show catalog is much cheaper here than at the museum’s store.Go figure.

Max Vadukul, Amy Winehouse, Miami, May 18, 2007 (printed 2009). Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Max Vadukul

Max Vadukul, Amy Winehouse, Miami, May 18, 2007 (printed 2009). Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Max Vadukul

Amy Winehouse on her wedding day in Miami, Florida. The exhibition  publicity references the significant 20th century fashion photographer, Cecil Beaton, saying, “Cecil Beaton, …, remembered the revolutionary feeling in photography when female models were allowed to spread their feet apart—even a little. Prior etiquette demanded that the two feet touch.”


Albert Watson,  LLCool J, 1992 (printed 2009). Inkjet print.

Albert Watson, LLCool J, 1992 (printed 2009). Inkjet print.

Here Albert Watson casts a sepia bust of LLCoolJ in the same iconic portaryal that he often casts fashion and pop figures.

Andy Earl,  Bow Wow Wow, 1981 (printed 2009). Inkjet print. Courtesy of Andy Earl

Andy Earl, Bow Wow Wow, 1981 (printed 2009). Inkjet print. Courtesy of Andy Earl

Getting a bit o’ art cultural reflective reference always pays off as in Andy Earl’s cover art for Bow Wow Wow. In  recreating Edouard Manet’s, then controversial painting,  painting of 1863, “Le déjeuner sur l’herbe” (The Luncheon on the Grass), some of the heat of public shock is hoped to transfer to the present. It does, and with such, uh, flash!

Barry Feinstein, Bob Dylan with Kids, Liverpool, England, 1966 (printed 2009). Gelatin silver print. Courtesy Barry Feinstein

Barry Feinstein, Bob Dylan with Kids, Liverpool, England, 1966 (printed 2009). Gelatin silver print. Courtesy Barry Feinstein

Throughout rock photography’s history, often, the most striking shots are those where the object of iconography is seen out of context. It seems to bring the Olympian pop gods down into the street, where they might commune with us mortals, such as in this shot of Dylan on the street. It’s like when we, as schoolchildren, espy one of our teachers at the deli counter, or on line at a movie. How thrilling!

I couldn’t write about the above shot without feeling it as mildly reminiscent of this cover of “The Free Wheelin’ Bob Dylan.”

Don Hunstein, Bob Dylan, with then-girlfriend, Suze Rotolo

Don Hunstein, Bob Dylan, with then-girlfriend, Suze Rotolo (not in show)

Shot by CBS staff photographer Don Hunstein one hundred years after Manet’s “Le déjeuner sur l’herbe”.

But, it’s still the performance shots which pack the biggest rock n roll punch.

Michael Putland, Mick Jagger, Philadelphia, 1982 (printed 1990s). Gelatin silver print. Collection of Michael Putland

Michael Putland, Mick Jagger, Philadelphia, 1982 (printed 1990s). Gelatin silver print. Collection of Michael Putland

Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present will bre on display at the Brooklyn Museum, October 30, 2009–January 31, 2010.


Ian Dickson, The Ramones at Eric's Club, Liverpool England (detail)

Ian Dickson, The Ramones at Eric's Club, Liverpool England (detail)

Rock on.

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  2 Responses to “Rock & Roll Photographers Well Hung in Tribute at Brooklyn Museum”

  1. love the Dylan shot……………

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