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Free F-Stop ISO Shutter Speed Chart – Subscribe for Updates

 

Download your Free Printable Chart of

Standard ISO F-Stops and Shutter Speeds  below

You are welcome to download and print this useful chart of the Standard Shutter Speeds, F-Stops and ISO Speeds including one third and one half speeds and apertures. (1/3 fstop – 1/2 f-stop – 1/2 shutter speed – 1/3 shutter speed – fractional ISO film speeds)

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PERMISSIONS: You may this list use this for yourself, or your classes, and may copy it as long as you leave in the copyright info (as a courtesy, please).

Please link back here to this page Free F-Stop ISO Shutter Speed Printable Chart as the source, and so, don’t distribute the file on your own! – Thanks.

Download Chart – Apertures, Shutter Speeds, ISO HERE

The Lists – - – Shutter Speeds – F stops – ISO Settings –PhotographyUncapped.com

The Lists – - – Shutter Speeds – Apertures – ISO Settings – - – Click for a full sized printable image

  18 Responses to “Free F-Stop ISO Shutter Speed Chart – Subscribe for Updates”

  1. Thank you, so much for this amazing chart, it’s the most clear and complete I ever see, very usefull.

  2. 1/3 f/stops have always presented a problem for me, your chart is missing silver bullet. Thanks

  3. Sorry, should have said “the” missing bullet.

  4. I downloaded and printed the chart. Much appreciated. It’s very useful.

    I have a query: What is the f/stop difference between 3.5 – 4.5? I’m sure I should be able to figure this out but not sure. I know 2.8 – 4.0 is one stop. 4.0 to 5.6 is one stop so 3.5 – 4.5 must be less than one full stop. Is it a 1/2 to 3/4th stop difference?

    Thanks
    David
    Ziff Photography

    • Hi David,

      Glad you find the chart useful.

      The difference between 3.5 and 4.5 is 2/3’s of a stop.
      You can use my chart to calculate this.
      Going down the F-Stop Thirds column from 3.5, the next third is 4.0, and then the next is 4.5; thus it is 2 thirds down from 3.5

      Hope this helps clarify.
      Ken Storch

  5. […] I am learning, I find it very helpful to keep this chart available as reference.  It allows me to quickly convert in 1/3 stops while watching a training […]

  6. very useful! i took the liberty to share the link to your page 🙂

  7. IS THERE A REASON SOME LENS START WITH A ONE AND ONE THIRD DIFFERENCE. MY TOKINA 35MM-200MM STARTS AT 3.5 THEN THE NEXT STOPS IS 5.6 AND MY KONICA 52MM STARTS AT 1.8 AND THEN GOES TO 2.8. I CAN USE HALF STOPS ON THE 52MM LENS SO THE HALF STOP BETWEEN 1.8 AND 2.8 WOULD BE 2.2 IS THAT CORRECT? THANKS FOR THE CHART I LAMINATED IT SO I CAN KEEP IT IN MY BAG.

    • Hi Richard,

      It’s mostly a design manufacturing issue. The manufacturer wants to get the largest maximum aperture at the least production costs.
      So they squeak out a little more on the aperture, but can’t always make the control ring get a click stop at the in-between setting.

      It’s not a big deal; many many lenses are that way.

      Glad you find the chart helpful.

      Cheers,
      Ken

  8. This is a wonderful, clear chart- thank you Ken!

  9. Went into a mild panic when I lost my original “cheat sheet” of shutter speed math. Phew…. I was great to find this chart again in 2016! Thank you!!

    • Hi Frank.
      And, thank you for writing.
      This is the primary reason I keep this site up, so that people can find this resource I created.
      Glad you find it useful.
      Feel free to spread the link, so that people can come to the site also.
      Cheers,
      Ken

  10. Best chart ever seen. It could only improve by starting at 50 ISO, because I don’t know a lot of people or cameras with lower ISO. Nowadays ISO goes further than 12500. But I’m being picky. Nice chart. Thanks.

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